Spring or Foam Mattress – Which One is Right For You?

If it’s been a while since you bought a mattress then you might be wondering if you should stick to a traditional spring mattress or switch to foam or even a hybrid spring-foam mattress.

High-quality hybrid spring mattresses tend to be the best type of mattress for side sleepers, stomach sleepers, back sleepers, hot sleepers, restless sleepers, and heavyweight sleepers over 230 lbs – whilst foam mattresses are better for couples, sleepers under 150 lbs, and skinny sleepers.

However, whilst buying a mattress online can save you a massive amount of money when compared to shopping in-store, it can be quite difficult to tell the difference between traditional spring, modern hybrid, cheap foam, and high-quality memory foam mattresses.

The rest of this article defines the different types of spring and foam mattresses and which ones are the best for specific sleeping requirements to make the buying process easier for you.

Alternatively: check out my list of the best mattresses to buy online here to choose from both spring and foam mattress types for specific needs (and get some significant discounts when you buy through the links and buttons on that page).

Spring vs Foam Mattresses – Suitability

Below I’ve explained exactly which types of spring and foam mattresses are suitable for specific sleeping requirements – as well as including the links to some suitable mattresses that you can buy via my more detailed mattress reviews.

If you’d like further clarification on the differences between regular spring, modern hybrid, latex foam, polyfoam, and memory foam mattresses then skip ahead to the last third of this article.

1: Babies and Infants: Specialist Foam + Spring

Naturepedic Crib Mattress.
Image Credit: Naturepedic Crib Mattresses (Naturepedic.com)

The best types of mattresses for babies are crib mattresses that are specifically made for infants under 2 years old and they can be made from foam, pocket springs, or standard springs.

However, you should NOT allow your baby to sleep on an adult memory foam or polyfoam mattress because according to the American Academy of Pediatrics [1]:

Soft mattresses, including those made from memory foam, could create a pocket (or indentation) and increase the chance of rebreathing or suffocation if the infant is placed in or rolls over to the prone position.

Suitable foam cot mattresses are typically made from reflex foam to create a firm surface that guards against rebreathing and tend to be lightweight, offer excellent support, are easy to clean, last a long time, and are well priced.

Standard spring cot mattresses tend to be a bit more expensive than regular foam crib mattresses but their combination of foam and springs helps to provide extra firmness and support that’s ideal for keeping your baby’s bones and joints properly aligned.

Pocket spring cot mattresses leverage individually wrapped coils and a foam comfort layer so that the surface of the mattress adapts to the exact contours of your baby’s body for maximum comfort and support.

You may also want to consider a 100% organic crib mattress so that you can rest assured that your baby isn’t breathing in any toxic chemicals or allergens (I recommend the crib mattresses from Naturepedic – listed here at #6 on my list of the best mattresses without fiberglass).

2: Children: Spring

The Naturepedic Verse Kids Mattress
Image Credit: The Naturepedic Verse Kids Mattress (Naturepedic.com)

Whilst the risk of rebreathing and suffocation decreases as your child ages, spring mattresses are still considered to be better for younger children because they can provide the firmness required to support their developing bones.

If you’re looking for a high-quality mattress for your children then I recommend the 2-in-1 Organic Mattress (ideal for young children) or the Verse Organic Mattress (for both young and older children) because they are MADE SAFE® certified as being free from toxic chemicals.

If you’d like to learn more about these mattresses check out the 6th entry on my list of the best fiberglass free mattresses here and click the buttons on that page to get 10% OFF either model (for a limited time only).

3: Side Sleepers: Hybrid Spring Memory Foam

The Puffy Lux Mattress.
Image Credit: The Puffy Lux (Puffy.com)

Hybrid spring memory foam topped mattresses are typically the best types of mattresses if you’re a side sleeper because the foam in the upper comfort layers is able to mold to the exact contours of your shoulders and hips for deeper pressure relief whilst the spring support core is able to provide adaptive support to keep you in good posture.

Cheap spring mattresses with a thin upholstered top layer are the worst types of mattresses for side sleepers because the lack of material compression means that the pressure in your shoulder and hip joints tends to intensify and cause discomfort.

If you’re a side sleeper in the 130 – 230 lbs range then you should be comfortable with a soft, medium-soft, or even a medium level of firmness – with extra soft potentially being better if you’re lighter than 130 lbs and a firmer feel if you weigh more than 230 lbs.

If you’re a side sleeper looking for a new mattress then I highly recommend the Puffy Lux because both the all-foam and hybrid spring memory foam models offer superior pressure relief and adaptive support in the side sleeping position – see why I’ve rated the Puffy Lux as the best mattress in a box to buy online here.

4: Stomach Sleepers: Hybrid Spring

The Amerisleep AS3 Hybrid Mattress.
Image Credit: The Amerisleep AS3 Hybrid Mattress (Amerisleep.com)

The best type of mattress for stomach and font sleepers is a hybrid spring mattress with a latex foam or memory foam top layer because the springs are able to help keep your hips in the correct alignment whilst the latex/memory foam provides just enough pressure relief on your ribcage without letting you slip into poor posture due to excessive material compression.

If you weigh between 130 and 230 lbs then a medium, medium-firm, or a firm mattress is typically the best option when sleeping on your front in order to guard against hip sinkage – only consider a softer mattress if you’re under 130 lbs or know that you’re ok with a softer feel.

I recommend the Amerisleep AS3 Hybrid for stomach sleepers because it balances pressure relief with support very well in the front sleeping position – see entry #3 here for more details and to get 30% OFF the AS3 Hybrid for a limited time only.

5: Back Sleepers: Hybrid Spring

The best type of mattress for back sleepers is a hybrid spring topped with either memory foam or latex foam because the foam can wrap around the contours of your lower and upper back whilst the springs provide adaptive support to maintain excellent posture and guard against back pain.

If you weigh between 130 lbs and 230 lbs then a medium level of firmness should be suitable, with medium-soft and medium-firm potentially being better if you’re closer to each respective end of that spectrum as a back sleeper.

I would also recommend the Amerisleep AS3 Hybrid for back sleepers because the features that also make it suitable for front sleepers (and even side sleepers) carry over – see entry #3 here to learn more and save 30% when you order through the links and buttons on that page.

6: Hot Sleepers: Hybrid Spring Latex Foam

The Layers of the Awara Mattress.
Image Credit: The Layers of the Awara Mattress (AwaraSleep.com)

The best type of mattress for hot sleepers and sleeping in a warm climate is a hybrid spring latex foam mattress because the springs allow for better airflow and heat dissipation, whilst the pinhole design of the latex foam allows trapped heat to be removed from the mattress and replaced with cooler ambient air as you move around in the mattress.

The worst type of mattresses for hot sleepers are all-foam, memory foam mattresses that don’t have any additional cooling properties like gel foam, open-celled foam, or infused copper/graphite because ‘traditional’ memory foam tends to absorb your body heat and reflect it back to you.

If you’re a warmer sleeper looking to stay cool and dry at night then I recommend the Awara hybrid spring latex mattress because it has excellent temperature regulation properties – click here to see why I’ve also rated the Awara #1 for restless sleepers too.

7: Allergies: Organic Latex Foam

The Botanical Bliss Mattress From PlushBeds.
Image Credit: The Botanical Bliss (PlushBeds.com)

The best type of mattress if you have allergies triggered by dust mites, pet dander, or mold spores is an organic latex mattress because the natural latex can help to combat microbes and reduce the rate at which dust mites and other allergens can enter the mattress.

A mattress that’s made from natural latex with a high organic content and a lack of synthetic foams can also be beneficial if you have sensitive skin, asthma, eczema, or other sensitivities because it reduces allergen exposure.

The worst types of mattresses if you have such allergies and sensitivities are cheap spring mattresses that can harbor a high amount of allergens in the materials, and cheap polyfoam/memory foam mattresses that do not have the CertiPUR-US®, STANDARD 100 by OEKO-TEX®, MADE SAFE®, or similar certifications to ensure that toxic chemicals are absent.

If you’re looking for a hypoallergenic mattress that can help to combat your allergies and contribute to a non-toxic sleeping environment then I highly recommend the Botanical Bliss from PlushBeds – click here to discover why the Botanical Bliss is my #1 rated mattress for allergies here.

8: Restless Sleepers: Hybrid Spring Latex Foam

The Awara Mattress
Image Credit: The Awara Mattress (AwaraSleep.com)

The best type of mattress if you’re a restless sleeper is a hybrid spring latex mattress because the buoyancy of the latex foam combines with the bounce of the springs so that you can switch positions easily without getting bogged down in the materials, whilst the foam itself can also help to soothe the pressure points that may be causing your restlessness in the first place.

The worst type of mattress if you’re a restless sleeper is a cheap spring mattress with a thin upholstered top layer because the springs may be more easily felt and contribute to your restlessness.

If you’re a restless sleeper then I recommend the Awara hybrid – click here to find out why and to save $300 when you buy through the links on this page now.

9: Heavy Weight Sleepers: Hybrid Spring Latex Foam

The best type of mattress if you’re a heavier weighted sleeper over 230 lbs is a hybrid spring latex mattress with individually wrapped coils that’s at least 10-12 inches thick because the deeper profile can cater to more weight whilst the robust coils can guard against sinkage and provide adaptive support to help keep you in good posture.

The worst types of mattresses for heavier weighted sleepers over 230 lbs are cheap spring and all-foam mattresses that are less than 8 inches thick and/or have a poor support core because you will likely sink too far into the mattress and end up in bad posture.

As a heavier weighted sleeper, you should consider adding a touch more firmness to increase the surface tension and guard against excessive sinkage.

So if you’re a heavier weighted front, back, or side sleeper over 230 lbs then you might want to consider medium, medium-firm, firm, and even extra-firm mattresses depending on how heavy you are.

I once again recommend the Awara hybrid mattress for heavier weighted sleepers because it has a medium-firm feel, a deep 13-inch profile, and excellent support.

10: Light Weight Sleepers: Memory Foam

The best type of mattress if you’re a lighter weighted sleeper under 150 lbs is an all-foam, memory foam mattress with a softer level of firmness because the greater capacity for compression means that you can naturally sink more deeply into the materials so that the pressure is dissipated away from your joints and into the foam to reduce internal compression forces and increase comfort.

The worst types of mattresses for lighter weighted sleepers under 150 lbs are firmer spring mattresses because the increased surface tension means that you’ll tend to lie more ‘on top’ of the materials which can lead to a build-up of pressure and discomfort in your joints.

The all-foam version of the Puffy Lux is an excellent choice if you weigh less than 150 lbs because the foam allows you to sink more deeply into the materials and also provide excellent pressure relief on the more angular regions of your body.

11: Skinny Sleepers: Memory Foam

The best type of mattress if you have a low body fat percentage is an all-foam, memory foam mattress with a soft level of firmness because the highly adaptive nature of the foam means that the mattress will sculpt itself around your body shape to alleviate the pressure on the more prominent regions of your body whilst also allowing you to sink more into the materials for more comfort on your joints.

The worst type of mattress for skinny sleepers is a cheap spring mattress that’s too firm because the increased surface tension and the prominence of the springs will increase pressure points and lead to discomfort.

I once again recommend the Puffy Lux all-foam mattress if you have a lower body fat percentage because the memory foam dissipates and soothes pressure very well.

12: Long Lasting: Hybrid Spring Latex Foam

The best type of mattress that’s going to last for a long time and resist sagging is a hybrid spring latex foam mattress because the robustness of the springs combined with the durability of the latex means that the mattress is going to be able to resist wear and tear very well.

Cheap spring and polyfoam/memory foam mattresses have the shortest lifespan because the lower density foam and inferior quality materials are more likely to wear out faster and result in a saggy mattress that needs replacing sooner.

The Awara has all the hallmarks of a long-lasting mattress – including 4 inches of durable Dunlop latex in the top layer and a thick 9-inch layer of premium pocket coils in the support core.

13: Couples: Memory Foam

All-foam, memory foam/polyfoam mattresses are the best for couples because the absence of springs makes for a quiet mattress, whilst the foam itself is able to soak up movements and shock waves very well so that you’re less likely to wake each other up as you move around in the night or sit on the edge of the bed.

The worst type of mattress for couples is a cheap spring mattress that’s less than 8 inches thick because movements will be more easily felt as you move around.

If you’re looking for a quiet mattress that absorbs movements superbly then I recommend the all-foam version of the Puffy Lux.

14: Value For Money: Hybrid Spring

The Awara Mattress Set Up.
Image Credit: The Awara Mattress Set Up (AwaraSleep.com)

The best types of mattresses for the money are high-quality hybrid mattresses because they can last up to 10 years or more with the right care whilst also providing an excellent balance of pressure relief and support that will suit just about every sleeping style and position.

The worst mattresses for the money are low-cost spring or foam mattresses because although they may be cheaper, they are likely to wear out much more quickly, become uncomfortable, and need replacing sooner – meaning that it would probably be more cost effective to go for a higher priced but longer lasting model from a reputable brand.

If you’re looking for a long-lasting mattress that’s worth the money then I once again recommend the Awara hybrid because of its versatility and durability – click here to learn more and get $300 OFF when you order through the links on that page.

Spring vs Foam Mattresses – The Differences

The main difference between traditional spring mattresses and mattresses made entirely from polyfoam, memory foam, or latex foam is that spring mattresses tend to have more bounce whilst the foam mattresses tend to provide better pressure relief.

However, many traditional spring mattresses have been superseded by modern hybrid mattresses because they offer the support and bounce of the springs whilst providing the pressure-relieving qualities of memory foam, latex foam, and even polyfoam.

Below is a detailed description and comparison between hybrid spring, regular spring, latex foam, polyfoam, and memory foam mattresses.

Hybrid (Spring and Foam)

A hybrid mattress is comprised of a spring core with an upper comfort and transition layer that consists of either memory foam, latex foam, polyfoam, or a blend of foams.

Hybrid mattresses typically differ from traditional spring mattresses by making use of individually wrapped coils to provide adaptive support and dampen motion transfer whilst also providing a thicker, higher-quality comfort layer for better pressure relief.

With the right specifics selected, high-quality hybrid mattresses are suitable for just about every sleeping position, style, and requirement – whilst also being highly durable and offering good value for money.

Pros

  • Good pressure relief to remove discomfort on the more angular regions of your body.
  • Strong and adaptive underlying support that’s suitable for both light and heavier weighted sleepers.
  • Promotes airflow and heat dissipation to help regulate your temperature and cool you down as required.
  • Strong edge support to prevent sagging and roll-off near the perimeter of the bed.
  • Individually wrapped coils can dampen movements and reduce noise to help couples sleep more soundly.
  • The springs provide a subtle bounce to help combination sleepers switch positions more easily without getting bogged down in the materials.
  • High-quality hybrid mattresses are durable, sag-resistant, and could last up to 10 years or more with the right care.
  • Good value for money overall when you factor in the potential added lifespan of the mattress.

Cons

  • High-quality hybrid mattresses typically cost more than regular spring mattresses up-front. One way to offset this is to buy a mattress on finance with 0% APR to help spread the cost in the short term as you make your money back via the extra nights of use gained relative to the better durability and lifespan.
  • As with all types of mattresses, the quality can vary significantly from brand-to-brand – the hybrid mattresses featured on my list of the best mattresses to buy online are top quality.
Memory Foam vs. Hybrid Mattress – Which Is Best? (Mattress Clarity)

Memory Foam

Memory foam mattresses are made from polyurethane foam that has other chemicals mixed in to make the foam more viscous and elastic [2].

Memory foam mattresses can come as an ‘all-foam’ design where the top layers are made from memory foam and the support core is made from high-density polyfoam, or as a hybrid – where the lower support core is made from springs.

Memory foam excels at providing adaptive pressure relief by using your body heat and weight to allow the foam to adjust to the exact contours of your body to provide more comfort when compared to a regular spring mattress that only uses a thin upholstered top layer.

Whilst all-foam memory foam mattresses are excellent at dampening movements and inhibiting noise so that couples can sleep more soundly.

The biggest drawback to memory foam mattresses is that they tend to retain heat which may cause some sleepers to sleep hot and/or sweat too much.

Pros

  • Highly adaptive to provide better pressure relief when compared to regular spring mattresses.
  • All-foam memory foam mattresses are almost silent due to the lack of springs.
  • All-foam memory foam mattresses dampen vertical and cross-motion transfer so that you’re less likely to feel your partner sitting on the edge of the bed and shuffling around during the night.
  • The higher density of memory foam makes it more durable and longer-lasting than lower density polyfoam.
  • Memory foam may help to block allergens like dust mites from entering the mattress and therefore help those who have dust mite allergies.

Cons

  • Some memory foam mattresses may cause you to feel hot and sweaty – go for a hybrid memory foam design with breathable foams to allow for better air circulation and heat dissipation to combat this issue.
  • All-foam memory foam mattresses can sometimes have too much sinkage and become difficult to move around in – go for a hybrid spring-memory foam model to provide underlying bounce and to guard against sinkage (especially if you’re a heavier weighted sleeper over 230 lbs).
  • Memory foam mattresses that are too soft or firm may cause back pain, joint pain, or other physical discomforts.

Specific Types of Memory Foam

Not all memory foam mattresses are the same.

Aside from being made entirely of foam or having springs in the support core, the memory foam itself can differ from brand-to-brand and even between models of the same brand.

For example, some Tempur-Pedic mattresses are made with memory foam that’s designed to be more cooling than their cheaper models.

In many cases, the bigger mattress brands like Amerisleep and Tempur-Pedic use proprietary memory foam formulas so it’s difficult to know the exact ingredients that go into their memory foam mattresses.

However, they will typically tell you if their memory foam has any of the following features because they are typically seen as offering value for the customer:

  • Copper-infused memory foam – memory foam mattresses infused with copper may help to dissipate heat, wick away moisture, and combat microbes for a more hygienic and cooling sleep experience.
  • Gel-infused memory foam – some memory foam mattresses have gel mixed into the top layer or have gel bead infusions to help dissipate heat and feel cool to the touch. Be aware that some gel memory foam mattresses may freeze or feel stiff and very low temperatures.
  • Graphite-infused memory foam – graphite is often infused into the memory foam to help dissipate heat and keep you cool.
  • Open-celled memory foam – this type of memory foam is more breathable than traditional memory foam and tends to dissipate heat better and regulate your temperature.
  • Ventilated memory foam – ventilated memory foam may use convoluted ‘eggshell’ foam, air channels, or perforations to further enhance airflow and increase breathability so that you can sleep cooler.
The Pros and Cons of Memory Foam (Mattress Makers)

Latex Foam

Latex foam mattresses can be made from natural latex derived from the sap of the Hevea brasiliensis tree, synthetic latex (SBR rubber), or a blend of natural and synthetic latex.

Some natural latex mattresses may be made from organic latex – look for the GOLS (Global Organic Latex Standard) certification to ensure that the latex is actually organic.

Latex mattresses can be made entirely from latex (‘all-latex’) or take the form of hybrid spring latex mattresses where coils are included in the base layer.

Natural latex mattresses are best for allergy control, durability, bounce, and sleeping cool.

The main drawback is the typically higher price point – especially if a large amount of organic latex is used.

Pros

  • Natural latex is highly durable and makes for some of the longest-lasting mattresses that you can buy (latex mattresses may last longer than 10 years when compared to the average spring mattress lifespan that’s around 5-7 years).
  • Latex mattresses are the best for sleeping cool (especially when they have a spring core) because unlike some memory foam, latex doesn’t require your body heat to change shape and conform to your body and the pinhole design allows for hot air to be pumped out of the mattress and replaced with cooler ambient air as you move around.
  • Natural and organic latex mattresses are better if you have allergies because the anti-microbial properties of the latex may help to inhibit mold growth and limit dust mite penetration (dust mites are a common cause of allergies and can even make conditions like asthma worse [3]).
  • Latex mattresses that are made entirely from natural latex and organic materials aren’t toxic because they don’t contain synthetic chemicals and components – look for the GOLS certification to ensure a minimum of 95% organic material and additional certifications like MADE SAFE®, CertiPUR-US®, and/or STANDARD 100 by OEKO-TEX® for additional assurance that there are no toxic chemicals in the finished product.

Cons

  • Latex mattresses are some of the most expensive that you can buy – look for hybrid versions and natural latex that’s not organic if you’d like to keep the cost down without sacrificing on quality.
  • It can be difficult to find out if a mattress is made mostly from natural latex or if it has a significant amount of synthetic latex baked in (synthetic latex tends to be less durable, smell more, and not as good for allergies) – look for the GOLS certification to ensure a minimum of 95% organic material if you want to be sure.
  • Latex tends to be a bit more bouncy and responsive than memory foam – which is great for guarding against sinkage and allowing for switching positions easily – but it may mean that couples can feel each other moving around a bit more. However, latex tends to dampen movements relatively well when compared to traditional spring mattresses.

Polyfoam

Polyfoam tends to be used in the comfort, transition, or support cores in conjunction with other materials like springs.

However, it’s possible to get mattresses that are derived entirely from polyfoam – the most common example being all-foam mattresses with memory foam in the top layer (which is derived from polyfoam) and high-density polyfoam in the support core.

Mattresses that don’t contain memory foam in the top layer and are instead made entirely from polyfoam are some of the cheapest mattresses that you can buy.

However, all-foam polyfoam mattresses have the worst expected lifespan (potentially less than 5 years) and they may off-gas heavily (smell of chemicals after unboxing).

Pros

  • All-polyfoam mattresses tend to inhibit motion transfer very well and are almost silent – making them a fair choice for restless couples.
  • All-polyfoam mattresses are relatively light and easy to move around.
  • All-polyfoam mattresses are very cheap.
  • All-polyfoam mattresses tend to offer a fair amount of pressure relief.
  • All-polyfoam mattresses may be more breathable and trap less heat than memory foam topped mattresses.

Cons

  • All-polyfoam mattresses have the worst durability and lifespan.
  • All-polyfoam mattresses tend to compress more under heavier weights which makes them a poor choice if you weigh more than 230 lbs.
  • All-polyfoam mattresses aren’t as adaptive as higher density memory foam which means that the pressure relief may not be as good.
  • All-polyfoam mattresses typically have poor spinal support and may sag/indent prematurely.

Spring

Traditional spring mattresses are starting to be replaced by hybrid spring mattresses that have memory foam or latex in the top comfort layers because they confer additional benefits such as better pressure relief when compared to an upholstered comfort layer.

However, you can still buy high-quality spring mattresses such as the Aviya spring mattress (more details available in my list of the best mattresses to buy online here).

And there are plenty of cheap spring mattresses with a polyfoam top layer that you can buy elsewhere online too.

The main benefit of buying a spring mattress is that they are super cheap – however, this typically comes at the expense of reduced durability.

So you might be better off paying more for a high-quality hybrid mattress because it will likely last longer – meaning that you pay less overall per each night of sleep.

Pros

  • Spring mattresses tend to have a high amount of bounce – which makes moving around in the mattress easier when compared to an all-foam design.
  • You’ll often find that spring mattresses have better edge support when compared to foam mattresses that don’t have added edge support.
  • Spring mattresses tend to sleep cooler than all-foam memory foam mattresses.

Cons

  • Spring mattresses made with a Bonnell, offset, or continuous coil core tend to transfer movement more easily than all-foam mattresses and even hybrid mattresses that use individually wrapped coil cores – plus the noise potential is also greater (which collectively is bad news for couples).
  • Spring mattresses tend to be longer lasting than cheap polyfoam mattresses (around 5-7 years) but typically don’t last as long as high-quality memory foam mattresses (6-8 years), hybrid mattresses (7-10 years), or all-latex mattresses made from high-quality organic latex (8-12 years).

Conclusion: Hybrid Spring-Foam Mattresses Win

So which type of mattress is better – foam or spring?

The best types of mattresses overall are hybrid spring mattresses with either a memory foam or latex foam comfort layer in order to get the bounce, support, and breathability of the spring core whilst also leveraging the pressure-relieving qualities of high-quality foam for a more balanced sleep experience.

However, high-quality all-foam mattresses may be more suitable for specific needs such as having a near-silent mattress or maximizing pressure relief – although a good quality hybrid spring mattress with individually wrapped coils and a thick comfort layer will suffice in many cases.

The worst types of mattresses overall are cheap, low-quality spring mattresses and all-foam mattresses because they are more likely to be uncomfortable, wear out faster, and need replacing sooner.

Click the button below to see some of the best hybrid, spring, and all-foam mattresses that you can buy online now (with significant discounts available too).


Sources and References

[1] The American Academy of Pediatrics – SIDS and Other Sleep-Related Infant Deaths: Updated 2016 Recommendations for a Safe Infant Sleeping Environment. Accessed 11/9/20.

[2] Wikipedia – Memory Foam. Accessed 11/9/20.

[3] HealthLine – Asthma Caused by Dust Mites May Damage Lung Cells. Accessed 11/9/20.

Image Licensing

Featured image: ‘Industrial Bedroom Design’ by Pixelshot – used with permission under Canva’s One Design Use License Agreement (see details).

All other images used with permission under partnership agreements with selected mattress vendors.

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